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slaughterhouse90210:

“Some people are born to make great art and others are born to appreciate it. … It is a kind of talent in itself, to be an audience, whether you are the spectator in the gallery or you are listening to the voice of the world’s greatest soprano. Not everyone can be the artist. There have to be those who witness the art, who love and appreciate what they have been privileged to see.”
― Ann Patchett,
Bel Canto

vintageanchorbooks:

The Daily Rituals of Famous Writers

Austen rose early, before the other women were up, and played the piano. At 9:00 she organised the family breakfast, her one major piece of household work. Then she settled down to write in the sitting room, often with her mother and sister sewing quietly nearby. If visitors showed up, she would hide her papers and join in the sewing. Dinner, the main meal of the day, was served between 3:00 and 4:00. Afterward there was conversation, card games, and tea. The evening was spent reading aloud from novels, and during this time Austen would read her work-in-progress to her family.

Imagine Jane Austen waking you up every day with that infernal piano.

centuriespast:

A spectacular gold ring around 1,400 years old went on display with other archaeological treasures at Saffron Walden Museum.
The ring is highly decorated with Anglo-Saxon motifs including birds and interlaced ornament, but it is the engraving on the bezel which has really excited the experts. This shows a belted human figure with a cross below a bird of prey, an intriguing mix of pagan Anglo-Saxon and Christian symbols. It has been dated it to 580 - 650 AD, around the time of the Sutton Hoo burial, when the new Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, including the kingdoms of Kent, Essex and East Anglia, were choosing between traditional beliefs and Christianity.
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centuriespast:

A spectacular gold ring around 1,400 years old went on display with other archaeological treasures at Saffron Walden Museum.

The ring is highly decorated with Anglo-Saxon motifs including birds and interlaced ornament, but it is the engraving on the bezel which has really excited the experts. This shows a belted human figure with a cross below a bird of prey, an intriguing mix of pagan Anglo-Saxon and Christian symbols. It has been dated it to 580 - 650 AD, around the time of the Sutton Hoo burial, when the new Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, including the kingdoms of Kent, Essex and East Anglia, were choosing between traditional beliefs and Christianity.

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